Social housing, economic activity and ‘residualisation’ – historical perspectives

The nature and role of social housing has obtained increasing prominence in national policy debates over the last four decades. The introduction of generous discounts for council tenants to buy their homes under the Right to Buy from 1980 onwards, and its more recent ‘reinvigoration’ and extension to housing association homes has resulted in the … More Social housing, economic activity and ‘residualisation’ – historical perspectives

BME housing sector a key bulwark against racial discrimination and disadvantage in housing on ‘Stephen Lawrence Day’

The first ‘Stephen Lawrence Day’ provides an opportunity to take stock of the extent and nature of racism, especially institutional racism, in the UK. The 20th anniversary of the McPherson Inquiry which dissected the death and police handling of black teenager Stephen Lawrence underscored the persistence of institutional racism in many sectors of the economy, … More BME housing sector a key bulwark against racial discrimination and disadvantage in housing on ‘Stephen Lawrence Day’

Social tenants live increasingly precarious lives in a marginalised social housing sector

The decline of social housing from 1 in 3 of all homes to just 1 in 6 over the last forty years has resulted in a ‘residualised’ sector in England, which caters mostly for a disadvantaged tenant group living increasingly precarious lives. Our new research, to be published on 15th April, brings together a range … More Social tenants live increasingly precarious lives in a marginalised social housing sector

Social housing more diverse but satisfaction of protected characteristics groups a concern

Our forthcoming report ‘Fit for All – Equality, Diversity and Satisfaction in 21st Century Social Housing’ reveals that the social tenant group has become more diverse in the last two decades, despite Equality, Diversity and Inclusion among senior housing staff lagging behind. Across most protected characteristic groups there has been progress – ore BME tenants, … More Social housing more diverse but satisfaction of protected characteristics groups a concern

Social housing’s ‘racial satisfaction gap’

The Guardian’s recent research into the extent of racial bias in many aspects of British life underscores how racism has not disappeared from the national scene despite decades of equality and human rights legislation. While the findings of the Guardian’s survey of 1,000 BME people are based on perceptions of racial bias by Britain’s BME, … More Social housing’s ‘racial satisfaction gap’

Radically rethinking the landlord-tenant relationship

There has been much recent research into the implications for public services, such as health, housing and social care, when importing the practices and language of the marke Much of this research dovetails with that by the Human City Institute, which explores how social housing might be reshaped and firmly moved away from creeping commercialism … More Radically rethinking the landlord-tenant relationship

Mutualism not more managerialism is the answer is to give social tenants more of a say

It’s rumoured that the Social Housing Green Paper, delayed again, will recommend a number of ways, including league tables of social landlord performance, to respond to issues raised by social tenants with government officials in the year-long roadshow on which the Green Paper is based. League tables, strengthening of tenant complaints procedures, and perhaps a … More Mutualism not more managerialism is the answer is to give social tenants more of a say

Rough sleeping rises yet again and is further testament to a failed housing policy writes Kevin Gulliver

The latest official figures from the rejigged Department of Housing, Communities and Local Government (DHCLG) reveal that rough sleeping in England has risen again – the seventh year in a row under Conservative-led administrations. An estimated 4,751 people were sleeping rough in 2017, up 15% on 2016, and 170% since 2010. The rough sleeping figures … More Rough sleeping rises yet again and is further testament to a failed housing policy writes Kevin Gulliver